pds_version_id = pds3 label_revision_note = object = instrument instrument_host_id = voyager_1,voyager_2 instrument_id = iss

PDS_VERSION_ID = PDS3
LABEL_REVISION_NOTE = " "
OBJECT = INSTRUMENT
INSTRUMENT_HOST_ID = "VOYAGER_1,VOYAGER_2"
INSTRUMENT_ID = ISS
OBJECT = INSTRUMENT_INFORMATION
INSTRUMENT_NAME = " NARROW_ANGLE_CAMERA "
INSTRUMENT_TYPE = "VIDEO CAMERA"
INSTRUMENT_DESC = " "
Instrument Overview
================
The narrow-angle Voyager 1 and 2 cameras, mounted on the scan
platform, are designed to work with the bore-sighted wide-angle
cameras to optimize resolution and areal coverage. The narrow angle
cameras has a field of view of 7.4 X 7.4 mrad and an eight position
filter wheel, containing 2 clear, 2 green, orange, blue, violet, and
UV filters to allow multicolor imaging in mosaicing mode. Each frame
consists of 800 lines with 800 eight-bit picture elements. Because of
the small amount of onboard memory, operational options were limited
and observing sequences were planned far in advance.
Scientific Objective
===============
One objective of the Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Sub-Sytem (ISS)
teams was to provide a continuous set of multicolor images composed of
3 to 4 colors, taken every 72 degrees of rotation, mapping the planet
as it rotates. This data have been processed and mapped into
cylindrical maps that allow investigation of temporal evolution of
specific cloud features.
Instrument Calibration
=================
Various preflight and in-flight tests of the ISS camera were performed
to characterize the instrument performance and calibration. The
magnetically focused vidicon was subject to geometric distortion and
had a nonlinear response to incident light. Correction for distortion
expands the observed field to a frame nearly 1000 X 1000 pixels. A
cube consisting of eight 800 X 800 planes on increasing exposure was
generated for each filter to allow photometric correction, accounting
for the individual response of each pixel. An X-Y reseau grid was
imposed on the vidicon. These marks were used to determine the focal
length (1500 mm) and field of view (7.4 x 7.4 mrad) of the camera.
Exact knowledge of the x-y position of the 202 reseau marks allows the
"pin-cushion" distortion to be removed by double linear interpolation.
This data set has been processed, using standard VICAR routines.
Because center to limb gradients have been analytically removed and
the images stretched and filtered absolute photometric calibration is
not required.
Operational Considerations
=====================
To adapt to limitations of on-board memory, the ISS cameras are
designed to be commanded to operate in several modes. These cyclics
are driven by command sequences that designate the type of scan
pattern for a mosaic, the starting point of the mosaic, the filter and
exposure sequence at each location in the mosaic grid, the camera mode
(i.e. narrow angle only, both simultaneously, or both alternately),
and the read out mode. The filter wheels on the narrow and wide-angle
cameras could be selected independently and changed from picture to
picture. The shutter assembly controlled the duration of the shutter,
yielding exposures between 0.005 and 15 sec, in standard mode.
Optics and Camera
===============
The narrow-angle camera is mounted on the Voyager scan platform with
its optical axis nominally coaligned with the wide-angle camera. It
employed a 1500-mm focal length all-spherical, catadioptic cassegrain
telescope with an f-stop of 8.5. The field of view is 7.4 x 7.4 mrad,
and the plate scale is 84.82 pixels/mm.
The narrow-angle camera used a B41-033 General Electro-dynamics
vidicon with a selenium-sulfur detector that had a limited spectral
response in the 280 to 640 nm. range. The active target area was 11.14
X 11.14 mm and an electron beam scanned the image line-by-line. The
scanning rate could be adjusted to require 48 to 480 sec for a full
readout. The system electronics converted the analog readout to an
8-bit digital signal. The signal, followed by engineering data could
then be transmitted directly to earth, or sent to the on-board
tape-recorder.
Filters
=====
The narrow-angle camera was equipped with broad-band filters selected
as a compromise set to allow accomplishment of satellite and
atmospheric goals. Clear were empty filter wheel positions.
Filter Wheel Color Center Bandwidth
Position Wavelength
(nanometers) (nanometers)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
0 clear no filter detector response 280 to 640
1 violet 400 +/-50 nm,
2 blue 480 +/- 50 nm
3 orange >570 nm
4 clear no filter detector response 280 to 640
5 green >530 nm
6 green >530 nm
7 ultraviolet 325 +/-45 nm.
Operational Modes
===============
The ISS cameras are commanded by a series of cylics that are assembled
into command loads. These cyclics determine the imaging sequences,
filters used, exposures, read-out modes and transmission or storage
each series of observations. The size of a command load is limited by
the size of the on-board memory. ISS camera commands are integrated
with all other commands during the execution of the command load.
"
END_OBJECT = INSTRUMENT_INFORMATION
OBJECT = INSTRUMENT_REFERENCE_INFO
REFERENCE_KEY_ID = "BENESHETAL 1978"
REFERENCE_DESC ="Benesh, M., P. Jepsen (1978) Voyager Imaging Science
Subsystem Calibration Report. NASA/JPL Report 618-802"
END_OBJECT = INSTRUMENT_REFERENCE_INFO
OBJECT = INSTRUMENT_REFERENCE_INFO
REFERENCE_KEY_ID = "SMITHETAL1977"
REFERENCE_DESC ="Smith, B. A. et al., 1977, Voyager Imaging
Experiment, Space Sci. Rev., 21, 103-127."
END_OBJECT = INSTRUMENT_REFERENCE_INFO
END_OBJECT = INSTRUMENT
END
PDS_VERSION_ID = PDS3
LABEL_REVISION_NOTE = "Charles C. Avis and Stewart A. Collins,
1983-02; Lyle Huber, 2008-02-14"
OBJECT = DATA_SET
DATA_SET_ID = "VGR1/VGR2-J-ISSNA-5-JUPITER-MOSAICS-V1.0"
OBJECT = DATA_SET_INFORMATION
DATA_SET_NAME = "Voyager 1 and 2 Time-Lapse Cylindrical-Projection
Jupiter Mosaics"
DATA_SET_COLLECTION_MEMBER_FLG = "N"
DATA_OBJECT_TYPE = IMAGE
START_TIME = 1979-01-06T05:29:20
STOP_TIME = 1979-06-24T21:21:34
DATA_SET_RELEASE_DATE = 2008-02-15
PRODUCER_FULL_NAME = " Charles C. Avis and Stewart A. Collins "
DETAILED_CATALOG_FLAG = "N"
DATA_SET_DESC = "
Data Set Overview
===============
These mosaics were assembled to provide a consistent set of data for
studies of Jovian atmospheric dynamics. The camera images used in
these mosaics have been processed as described below and projected
into global mosaics constructed in planetary coordinates. The format
is designed to facilitate quantitative measurements by investigators
without requiring the sophisticated software systems that are
necessary to process raw data sets. Data from the narrow-angle Voyager
cameras, which allowed global coverage, has been processed to remove
geometric distortions and nonlinear photometric response. This data
includes the early approach of Voyager 1 and 2 when the entire disc
could be imaged in one narrow-angle frame through the period when 2 X
2 mosaics were required to cover the planet. Limb-darkening due to
solar insolation angle and cloud scattering effects has been
analytically removed and the regions in each of 6 adjacent sets of
observations have been integrated into each cylindrical map. These 6
data bins are spaced at approximately 2 hour intervals; the 6th bin in
mosaic N is the same as the 1st bin in mosaic N+1, allowing for
"wrap-around" comparisons. Images obtained with the shortest
wavelengths were selected; blue(480+/-50nm) in the early Voyager 1
mosaics and violet (400+/-50nm) and ultraviolet(325+/-45nm) for later
Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 mosaics (See Tables 1 and 2). Each cylindrical
map is 960 and 965 lines for VGR 1 and VGR 2, respectively, by 3915
samples and projected at 9 pixels per degree.
Input Data
========
VGR 1 - FDS Count 14641.10 to 16027.43
Range (Mkm) 58.0 13.5
Rotation No. 1 112
Date 1979 January 06 1979 February 21
VGR 2 - FDS Count 18409.12 to 20178.04
Range (Mkm) 55.5 13.9
Rotation No. 266 408
Date 1979 April 25 1979 June 24
Creation of the Mosaics
==================
Processing Steps for Each Longitude
Each image is processed through the following steps utilizing
navigation data (the Voyager SEDR file):
1. Noise removal via a despiking algorithm.
2. Radiometric correction.
3. Removal of geometric distortion.
4. Location of planet center via a limb-fitting algorithm or, for
images without limb, by picking tiepoints
in common with an image with a limb.
5. Removal of limb darkening via a photometric function.
6. Map projection.
A set of cosmetic processing tasks were applied to the mosaics during
production. These tasks included:
1. Reseau mark and blemish removal.
2. Line drop replacement.
3. Removal of satellites and shadows.
4. Removal of miscellaneous garbage (usually lines).
5. Transform UV and blue projections to appear as violet projections.
6. Missing longitudes were either:
a. ignored or,
b. partially filled in by extending neighboring projections.
Generation of 2 X 2 Mosaics
Later in the Voyager 1 and 2 sequences those longitudes requiring
multiple frames for full coverage needed a mosaicking step. Each
completed projection covered a different portion of the sub-spacecraft
hemisphere of the planet. In the steps outlined above, all of the
frames for a single longitude were transformed to a common map
projection, essentially registering these pieces for mosaicking using
the following approach:
1. Clean the edges of each projection (resulting in sharply cut
borders).
2. Overlay all inputs with a priority scheme to favor images with
observable limb. Generation of these mosaics
involved a priority scheme for the case in which 2 or more inputs
covered the same area. The following rules
defined which input image received priority in areas of overlapping
coverage:
a. Two inputs: Use the pixel of the greater FDS count whose pixel is
non-zero.
b. Three or more inputs: Use the pixel of the smallest FDS count whose
pixel is non-zero.
These were not hard-and-fast rules, but generally followed guidelines.
They give images with visible limbs greater priority.
Global Mosaiking
Before mosaicing, each Voyager 2 UV projection and Voyager 1 blue and
UV projection is transformed to appear as a violet projection. This is
needed to ensure consistency of appearance both within each mosaic and
between mosaics.
The global mosaics were generated from the map-projected inputs. Each
input frame covered one entire longitude section (75 degrees) and was
derived from a single frame or complete or partial 2 X 2 mosaic. All
have the equator at line 483, but each has sample 1 at a different
longitude.
The final global mosaic is constructed from six projections as shown
below. The five projections for this rotation plus the last projection
of the previous rotation are laid down in increasing time order from
right to left such that each falls at the appropriate longitude. All
overlap regions are averaged.
<---------- TIME
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
5 4 3 2 1 5 LONGITUDE SECTION
\....................................................…....../
\.........../
Rotation N Rotation N-1
Parameters
The cylindrical mosaics have the following characteristics. The origin
of the array is the northwest corner of the mosaic. The mosaics should
be displayed with the origin in the upper lefthand corner with
longitude increasing from right to left. They are projected on a scale
of 9 pixels/degree in longitude. This results in a sampling rate of
138.464 km/pixel at the equator, compared with sampling rates of 450
to 100 km/pixel in these narrow angle frames incorporated in these
mosaics. The following chart specifies the Mosaic parameters
Spacecraft Location Size of Mosaic Latitudinal range Longitudinal
Scale
Of Equator (line, sample) (Planetocentric latitude) (Sys III W
longitude)
VGR 1 line 483 960, 3915 87.59 deg. to -80.86 deg Long =
[(3646-sample)/9] –3.35855E-08 * range(km)
VGR 2 line 483 965, 3915 87.59 deg. to -87.59 deg Long =
[(3646-sample)/9] –3.35855E-08 * range(km)
Applying this function 0 degrees longitude is located at
Sample 3628.49 for Rotation 1
Sample 3641.89 for Rotation 112
Sample 3629.23 for Rotation 266
Sample 3641.45 for Rotation 408
Rotation 1 begins at 5:29:20 UT January 6, 1979 spacecraft receive
time. Voyager 1 mosaics span 112 rotations (most of rotation 58 and
all of 59 were not imaged). Voyager 2 mosaics span 143 rotations from
266 to 408 with rotations (337 and 338 were not imaged).
Note: System III Longitude is based on periodic variation in
decametric signals and is used to relate cloud motions with the
rotation rate of the planet’s interior. According to International
Astronomical Union standards, System III longitude is defined with
longitude increasing westward or with time as seen by a remote
observer. The zero point corresponds to the longitude that was
coincident with the Earth-based observer’s central meridian at 0 h UT,
January 1, 1996 (Julian Day = 2438761.5). The rate is defined as
870.5366420 degrees/day, which yields a period of 9h55m29.711+/-0.04s
or 9.92492hrs. See Table 4 for ranges associated with individual
mosaics.
Latitude and Longitude
==================
All frames were projected using a normal cylindrical projection with a
scale of 9 pixels/degree or 138.4638 km/pixel at the equator and the
origin (0,0) of the array at the northwest corner and in all cases the
equator was placed at line 483. Because the projection size was 675
samples by 960 or 965 lines, each projection extended 75 degrees in
longitude. The vertical projection is proportional to the sine of
planetocentric latitude, the angle formed by the intersection of the
local radius with the equatorial plane. On an oblate planet the
radius, R(planetocentric latitude) = R(latc), is given as
R(latc) = a / [ (a/b)**2 (sin(latc))**2 + (cos(latc))**2 ]**1/2
where a is the equatorial radius = 71,400 km, and a/b is the ratio of
the equatorial radius to the polar radius of 1.069.
The line that corresponds to a given planetocentric latitude is
line = line(equator) – R(latc) * sin(latc) / scale = 483 – R(latc) *
sin(latc) / 138.4638.
Where line(equator) is the location of the equator and scale is the
projection scale in km/pixel.
To transform from line number to latitude, define Z as
Z = ( line(equator) – line ) * scale
then the transformation is
latc = arcsin[ Z / ( a**2 + ( 1 – (a/b)**2 ) * Z**2 )**1/2 ].
Note: Local illumination and reflectance tends to occur on
equipressure surfaces, therefore angles of incidence and reflectance
are referenced to the local normal. Thus, for removing the
limb-darkening planetographic latitude (latg), equivalent to the angle
formed at the intersection of the local normal with the equatorial
plane, is needed. On an oblate planet, planetographic latitude is
equal to or greater than the planetocentric latitude. With maximum
differences at mid latitude. The relation between the two angles is:
tan(latg) = (a/b)**2 * tan(latc).
The last 60 or so lines in a mosaic are black, due partly to the
viewing geometry. The spacecraft had a positive sub-spacecraft
latitude and thus could not see all the way to the south pole. This
effect was exacerbated by certain software restrictions.
The longitudinal extent of each of the 6 bins making up a global
mosaic can be defined by stating the longitude of the leftmost sample
(sample 1) of the bin For rotations 266 through 339, each frame was
projected such that the subspacecraft longitude plus 20 mapped to
sample 1. For the five longitude sections of rotations 340 through
408, sample 1 became longitude 120, 192, 264, 336, or 48 depending on
whether the subspacecraft longitude was about 100, 172, 244, 316, or
28 degrees. A similar approach was used for Voyager 1, which was
mosaiced later.
Uncorrected for light travel time error, the longitude of any point is
long = ( 3646 – sample ) / 9.
In the middle of this task, it was discovered that the Voyager SEDR
reports the spacecraft event time, the subspacecraft longitude at the
time the signal arrives at the craft. The reported SCLON is for the
moment of camera shuttering rather than for the instant at which the
imaged photons were reflected by Jupiter. The difference can be as
great as 3.5 minutes, thus, the light-travel time is needed to correct
for the rotation of the planet. This effect has been ignored in the
production of all mosaics to keep them consistent. As the correction
is range dependent, all frames will have different corrections. The
correction is applied such that
true long = long – dL
where the correction dL is given by dL = r*P / c degrees, r is the
range to planet surface in km, P is the planetary rotation rate in
deg/sec, and c is the speed of light. For Jupiter, dL = 3.35855E-08 *
r degrees, thus
true long = [ ( 3646 – sample ) / 9 ] – 3.35855E-08 * r.
Conversely,
sample = 3646 – [ 9 * long + 3.0227E-7 * r ].
See Table 1 for range values associated with individual data files. If
more accurate distance information is desired, see Table 2 . Since
Jupiter's radius is only 0.23 light-seconds, it matters little whether
r is measured to Jupiter's center or surface.
TABLE 1. VOYAGER 1 and 2 TIME-LAPSE CYLINDERICAL PROJECTION JUPITER
MOSAICS
See DOCUMENTS/TABLE_1.TXT.
Table 2 list OF all frames used to construct the mosaics
See DOCUMENTS/TABLE_2.TXT.
Photometric Processing
==================
Limb-Darkening Correction
Each input image has intrinsic shading due to variations in lighting
and viewing angles across the frame. This shading can be characterized
by a wavelength dependent photometric function that is a function of
illumination-viewing geometry (expressed in planetographic
coordinates) and the scattering properties of the atmosphere. The
Hapke photometric function (Hapke 1981), an analytical function
designed to quantify light scattered from a rough surface and with
enough degrees of freedom to assure removal of the limb-darkening, was
used. Hakpe’s reflectance function is given as
R(cosi,cose,g) = ( W / 4 ) * cosi / ( cosi + cose ) * { [ 1 + Q(tang)
] * PF(tang) + H(cosi) * H(cose) – 1 },
where cosi is cosine of the incident angle, cose is cosine of the
emergent angle and tang is the tangent of the phase angle, g, (the
solid angle formed by the intersection of the incident and emergent
rays). W is the single scattering albedo and H(X) is the multiple
scattering component due to porosity of the surface and is expressed
as
H(X) = ( 1 + 2 * X ) / ( 1 + 2 * X * SQRT( 1 – W ) )
where X is either cosi or cose.
Q(tang) is a multiple scattering term and is parameterized as
Q(tang) = EXP(-W**2/2) * [ 1-tang/2H ] * [ (3-EXP(-H/tang)) *
(1-EXP(-H/tang)) ] for tang > 0
= 0 for tang <= 0.
PF(tang) is the phase function of a single particle and is represented
as
PF(tang) = 1 + B * tang + C * ( 3 * tang**2 – 1 ) / 2.
Parameters were derived by trial and error are listed in Table 3:
TABLE 3. PARAMETERS USED FOR LIMB DARKENING REMOVAL
PARAMETER Symbol Violet Value UV Value Blue Value
Single scattering Albedo W 0.951 0.73 0.99
Surface texture B -0.068 -0.68 -0.013
Phase function Coefficient h 0.369 0.88 0.375
Coefficient 2nd Term of Phase Function C 0.0 0.0 0.0
Adjustment for Different Filters
All frames utilized for this task were chosen to be of the shortest
wavelength available. In general, images in the violet filter (409 nm)
were used. However, many times, the violets were replaced in the
imaging sequence by ultraviolets (338 nm), or blues (480 nm). When the
UV's or blues were used, a transformation was applied to give them the
appearance of a violet image. This transformation was additive in
nature and was defined in the following manner. Let V be the image
produced by averaging five different longitudes of violet projections.
Let U be the equivalent UV average. Applying a 7 line by 675 sample
low pass filter to (V-U+128) gives a correction image f having
latitudinal dependence only. The transformed UV image U' is derived
from the input UV image U by U'=U+f-128. It is interesting to note not
only that this correction worked very well for the large scale banded
structure, but that it also performed well for most of the individual
cloud systems.
High-Pass Filtering
No high-pass filtering was performed on the Voyager 2 mosaics (See
directory mosaicvgr2). Various forms of the Voyager 1 mosaics are
included in the data set. Both filtered (directory mosaicvgr1f) and
unfiltered (directory mosaicvgr1u) Voyager 1 mosaics are available. An
additional cosmetic step was performed on incomplete mosaics for
inclusion in movies where black gaps would distract from the
visualization. When data was missing, adjacent data with high incident
and emission angle was used to fill the gaps. When this was not
adequate, data from the previous or subsequent mosaic was used. For
the gap of two rotations in Voyager 2, 337 and 338 would be filled by
repeating 336 and 339. The filtered, filled (mosaicvgr1ff) and
unfiltered, filled (mosaicvgr1uf) are included for generating movies.
The high-pass filtering of Voyager 1 data was carried out to enhance
cloud structure. In order to minimize the effects of the
longitudinally variable cloud structure and maximize the removal of
the latitudinal belt-zone albedo variation, a filter window 21 lines
by 101 samples was used to compute the latitudinally dependent surface
brightness. The resulting value of a filtered pixel is given as
OUT = ( DN – ADN ) * BOOST + DCTRAN * DN + DCLEVEL.
Where, ADN is the average latitudinally dependent brightness and the
parameters BOOST, DCTRAN and DCLEVEL were selected to optimize the
visible cloud structure. Parameters with a linear dependence on
Rotation Number such that the higher resolution mosaics had the
greater boost of the high frequencies (See Table 4) were selected.
Table 4. Parameters used in filtering Voyager 1 mosaics.
See DOCUMENTS/TABLE_4.TXT.
Data
====
Table 1 contains the file name of each mosaic followed by the start
and stop time of the files and the range of the first image that was
incorporated into the existing mosaic. If more accurate range
information is desired, see Table 2. In the case of Voyager 1, the
same file name has been maintained and different processed versions
are stored in individual directories (Mosaicvgr1u = Voyager 1
unfiltered, Mosaicvgr1f = Voyager 1 filtered, Mosaicvgr1uf = Voyager 1
unfiltered and filled, and Mosaicvgr1ff = Voyager 1 filtered and
filled). The Voyager 2 unfiltered mosaics are in one directory. A
similar filtered version could be generated by applying a procedure
similar to the one given above.
Ancillary Data
===========
The standardized structure and level of reprocessing have incorporated
all necessary data. Thus, no ancillary data is needed to utilize these
files.
CONFIDENCE_LEVEL_NOTE = "
Confidence Level Overview
======================
Navigational accuracy of the mosaics is at the sub-pixel level.
Absolute photometry is not preserved as a result of limb darkening
corrections and adjustments for different filters.
Data Coverage and Quality
======================
Coverage of the mosaics is as complete as possible given the original
data set.
Limitations
=========
"
END_OBJECT = DATA_SET_INFORMATION
OBJECT = DATA_SET_TARGET
TARGET_NAME = JUPITER
END_OBJECT = DATA_SET_TARGET
END_OBJECT = DATA_SET
END
OBJECT = DATA_SET _REFERENCE_INFO
REFERENCE_KEY_ID = "Hapke 1981"
REFERENCE_DESC ="Hapke, Bruce (1981) Surface Reflectance, Jour. Of
Geophysical Research, Vol 86, p3039-3054”
END_OBJECT = DATA_SET _REFERENCE_INFO
END_OBJECT = INSTRUMENT
END

  • GIMNAZIJA ŠKOFJA LOKA 20062007 GEOGRAFIJA SLOVENIJE MARJAN LUŽEVIČ PROF
  • 77 MINISTERSTVO ZAHRANIČNÍCH VĚCÍ ČESKÉ REPUBLIKY L
  • ZASADY PRZEWOŻENIA RZECZY I ZWIERZĄT W KOMUNIKACJI MIEJSKIEJ ORGANIZOWANEJ
  • WHY DO WE NEED GOVERNMENT? AMERICA’S FORM OF GOVERNMENT
  • 38 PAUTAS TÉCNICAS PARA LA CORRECTA INSTALACIÓN Y USO
  • 2 MARTS 2020 PRODUKTRESUMÉ FOR CALCIUMSANDOZ BRUSETABLETTER 1 DSPNR
  • UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SCHOOL OF LAW STUDY ABROAD
  • VERSION PRÉLIMINAIRE NON ÉDITÉE RAPPORT DU GOUVERNEMENT DE LA
  • DECLARACIÓN RESPONSABLE DE LOS DATOS DEL PERSONAL IMPUTADO AL
  • LOCUM FEMALE DEDICATED SELFHARM SUPPORT WORKER CONTRACT MATERNITY
  • HKEX LISTING DECISION HKEXLD161(AUGUST 2000) (WITHDRAWN IN SEPTEMBER 2009)
  • SOLICITUD DE INSCRIPCIÓN PARA LA REALIZACIÓN DE LA PRUEBA
  • PAMIĘTAJ NIE JESTEŚ SAM! 30122020 R PORADNIA PSYCHOLOGICZNOPEDAGOGICZNA W
  • III MIEJSCE ZĄBKOWSKIEJ „DWÓJKI” NA XII MAZOWIECKICH IGRZYSKACH MŁODZIEŻY
  • ПРИНЯТ РЕШЕНИЕМ МУНИЦИПАЛЬНОГО СОБРАНИЯ ФЕДОРОВСКОГО МУНИЦИПАЛЬНОГО РАЙОНА САРАТОВСКОЙ ОБЛАСТИ
  • KEY CONTACTS WITHIN THE LIFE UNIT MR PHILIP OWEN
  • CITIZEN RESOLUTION (FOR HEARING OFFICER COMPLETION) [CLICK
  • FILE DOES NOT EXIST
  • 18 POWERPLUSWATERMARKOBJECT357831064 MENOPAUSE POLICY NHS HIGHLAND WARNING – DOCUMENT
  • UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE SAN MARTÍN LICENCIATURA EN CIENCIA POLÍTICA
  • NAVODILO ZA UPORABO FENISTIL 1 MGG GEL DIMETINDENIJEV MALEAT
  • 1 ZARZĄDZENIE NR 5307 WÓJTA GMINY JELENIEWO 1 22
  • IN OCCASIONE DELLA GIORNATA DELLA MEMORIA LA FACOLTÀ DI
  • SKYPE CONFERENCE OCT 19TH WORKING GROUP GUIDO GOVERNATORI TARA
  • TC MİLLİ EĞİTİM BAKANLIĞI …………………………………… ……………………………………… SABOTAJLARA KARŞI KORUMA
  • AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEMATOLOGY HEMATOLOGY CURRICULUM SCOTT D
  • PATOLOGICKÁ ANATOMIE OKRUH OBECNÁ PATOLOGIE 1 ATROFIE
  • TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE OF CONTINENTAL CHEMICAL USA
  • NA PODLAGI ŠTIRINAJSTE TOČKE 19 ČLENA STATUTA EVROPSKE PRAVNE
  • BLATT 5 VON 5 PRESSEINFORMATION KOMMENTAR ZUR DIN EN